Using immersive virtual reality to remotely examine performance differences between dominant and non-dominant hands

Jack Owen Evans, Krasimira Tsaneva-Atanasova, Gavin Buckingham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Circle drawing may be a useful task to study upper-limb function in patient populations. However, previous studies rely on expensive and bulky robotics to measure performance. For clinics or hospitals with limited budgets and space, this may be unfeasible. Virtual reality (VR) provides a portable and low-cost tool with integrated motion capture. It offers potentially a more feasible medium by which to assess upper-limb motor function. Prior to use with patient populations, it is important to validate and test the capabilities of VR with healthy users. This study examined whether a VR-based circle drawing task, completed remotely using participant’s own devices, could capture differences between movement kinematics of the dominant and non-dominant hands in healthy individuals. Participants (n = 47) traced the outline of a circle presented on their VR head-mounted displays with each hand, while the positions of the hand-held controllers were continuously recorded. Although there were no differences observed in the size or roundness of circles drawn with each hand, consistent with prior literature our results did show that the circles drawn with the dominant hand were completed faster than those with the non-dominant hand. This provides preliminary evidence that a VR-based circle drawing task may be a feasible method for detecting subtle differences in function in clinical populations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2211-2226
Number of pages16
JournalVirtual Reality
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2023
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Assessment
  • Dominant hand
  • Meta Quest
  • Non-dominant hand
  • Stroke
  • Upper limb

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