Unpleasant surprises in the design of complex products: Why do changes propagate?

Owolabi Ariyo, Claudia M. Eckert, P. John Clarkson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper reports on an investigation into the modes of change propagation in complex products based on a series of case studies in an aerospace and an automotive company. The paper identifies three main conditions under which change tends to propagate and highlights the heterogeneous nature of factors that contribute to propagation. It was found that change tends to propagate between components when there are insufficient margins between coupled components, when there is an encroachment of design constraints or as a result of shortcomings of tools and processes used to support change processes. The paper concludes with a discussion on the implications of the nature of change propagation mechanisms on predicting the knock-on effects of change.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of 2006 ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information In Engineering Conference, DETC2006
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers
ISBN (Print)079183784X, 9780791837849
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes
Event2006 ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information In Engineering Conference, DETC2006 - Philadelphia, PA, United States
Duration: 10 Sep 200613 Sep 2006

Publication series

NameProceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference
Volume2006

Conference

Conference2006 ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information In Engineering Conference, DETC2006
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityPhiladelphia, PA
Period10/09/0613/09/06

Keywords

  • Causation
  • Change propagation
  • Predictability

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