Total or subtotal colectomy in patients undergoing surgery for primary or recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer

Anton Oseledchyk, Alina Abramian, Christina Kaiser, Manuel Debald, Christian Domröse, Nicholas Kiefer, Christian Putensen, Dimitrios Pantelis, Walther Kuhn, Nico Schäfer, Mignon Denise Keyver-Paik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: There is controversy as to whether performing a total or subtotal colectomy is justified in patients with advanced ovarian cancer, given its potential for morbidity and a negative effect on long-term quality of life. The aim of this study was to assess the perioperative complications, mortality and outcomes of patients who underwent total or subtotal colectomy as part of the surgical procedure for primary or recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer. Patients and Methods: All patients who had undergone surgery including a total or subtotal colectomy for advanced or recurrent ovarian cancer between 2005 and 2013 at our institution were retrospectively identified. Results: In this time period, 339 patients underwent surgery for epithelial ovarian cancer, which in 11 (3%) patients included a total or subtotal colectomy. Severe grade 3-4 postoperative complications occurred in 3 (27%) patients, and 1 (9%) patient died within 60 days of surgery. Conclusion: A total or subtotal colectomy is associated with increased but acceptable morbidity in selected patients undergoing primary cytoreductive surgery. However, in the recurrent/palliative setting, total or subtotal colectomy should be avoided as the prognosis is poor and the morbidity outweighs the clinical benefit.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)448-454
Number of pages7
JournalOncology Research and Treatment
Volume37
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 17 Apr 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Advanced ovarian cancer
  • Colectomy
  • Ileorectostomy
  • Recurrent ovarian cancer

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