Thermal ionization and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: Potential for application to studies on the biokinetics of molybdenum in humans

A. Giussani, P. Roth, E. Werner, P. Schramel, I. Wendler, F. Nüsslin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

The use of stable isotopes as tracers in biokinetic investigations provides a means to obtain important metabolic data directly in humans without exposing the subjects to undue risks. In this work, three types of mass spectrometers are compared with regard to the determination of the abundances of stable isotopes of molybdenum in natural and enriched aqueous samples. The data show a good response of thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) and of high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) to the isotopic enrichment of the samples, whereas conventional quadrupole ICPMS shows an unsatisfactory reproducibility of the results. Moreover, only TIMS can achieve an accuracy of better than 1 % for the obtained isotopic ratios. Although a tedious procedure for the preparation of the biological samples is required and less sensitivity is achieved as compared to ICPMS, TIMS still seems to be method of choice for the accurate assessment of isotope ratios as required in multitracer studies on human biokinetics of trace metals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)207-215
Number of pages9
JournalIsotopes in Environmental and Health Studies
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Accuracy
  • Humans
  • Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS)
  • Isotope analysis
  • Molybdenum isotopes
  • Sensitivity
  • Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS)

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