The Schlaining quartz-stibnite deposit, Eastern Alps, Austria: constraints from conventional and infrared microthermometry and isotope and crush-leach analyses of fluid inclusions

Marta Sośnicka, Stefan de Graaf, Giulio Morteani, David A. Banks, Samuel Niedermann, Malte Stoltnow, Volker Lüders

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Stibnite was mined until the end of the twentieth century in the Schlaining ore district, Austria, near the easternmost border of the Eastern Alps where windows of Penninic ophiolites and metasediments are exposed below Austroalpine tectonic units. In Early Miocene, structurally controlled small vein and metasomatic stibnite-quartz deposits were formed in Penninic Mesozoic calcareous marbles and calcite schists. Fluid inclusion studies identified two fluids involved in the mineralization: (i) a low-salinity, low-CO2 metamorphic fluid that precipitated quartz at approximately 240 °C and (ii) a stibnite-forming ore fluid that had a meteoric origin. There is no evidence of boiling or that the fluids mixed during mineralization. The ore components Sb and H2S were leached by fluid/rock interaction from buried rock units. Stibnite mineralization occurred by cooling the ore fluid to below 300 °C, at less than 2000 m depth. Quartz precipitated at slightly lower temperatures, approximately contemporaneous with stibnite. Fluid migration and ore deposition are probably related to high heat flow during the exhumation of the Rechnitz Window in response to Neogene extension and/or shallow Early Miocene andesitic magmatism. The study emphasizes that data obtained from the analyses of gangue minerals alone cannot routinely be used to infer the origin and depositional conditions of the associated ore minerals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)725-741
Number of pages17
JournalMineralium Deposita
Volume57
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2022

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