The Physics of Cold in the Cold War—“On-Line Computing” Between the ICBM Program and Superconductivity

Johannes Knolle, Christian Joas

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Superconductivity—the loss of resistance in various materials close to absolute zero temperature—was a hot topic after World War II. Advances in nuclear reactor technology led to the discovery of the isotope effect in 1950 (Maxwell 1950; Reynolds et al. 1950), which brought about crucial insights about the role of electron-lattice interactions in superconductors that ultimately led to the formulation of a microscopic theory of this phenomenon. Generations of physicists had been struggling to find an explanation of superconductivity ever since its discovery in 1911 by Heike Kamerlingh Onnes.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBoston Studies in the Philosophy and History of Science
PublisherSpringer Nature
Pages119-132
Number of pages14
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameBoston Studies in the Philosophy and History of Science
Volume299
ISSN (Print)0068-0346
ISSN (Electronic)2214-7942

Keywords

  • Absolute Zero Temperature
  • Eliashberg Equation
  • Hughes Aircraft
  • Nonlinear Integral Equation
  • Quantitative Theory

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The Physics of Cold in the Cold War—“On-Line Computing” Between the ICBM Program and Superconductivity'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this