The color activity concept: An emerging technique to characterize key chromophores formed by non-enzymatic browning reactions

T. Hofmann, O. Frank, S. Heuberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

It is well accepted that the non-enzymatic browning of thermally processed foods originates mainly from the Maillard reaction between reducing carbohydrates and amino compounds. To evaluate the key chromophores amongst the multiplicity of reaction products formed, a screening method was developed which is based on the determination of the visual threshold of colored fractions obtained after HPLC separation. This so called Color Dilution Analysis (CDA) is exemplified in the following paper which describes a browned aqueous xylose/furan-2-aldehyde/L-alanine solution. Twenty colored fractions were obtained, amongst which five fractions were evaluated with by far the highest color impacts. The identification experiments were, therefore, focused on the compounds evoking the intense color of these fractions. They revealed two 3(2H)-furanones (I, II), a 3(2H)-pyrrolinone (III), a pyrano[2,3-b]pyranone (IV) and a dione (V) as the key chromophores. In order to evaluate the color impact of these color-active compounds more exactly, their absolute color contribution was measured by calculating their color activity values as the ratio of their concentrations to their color detection thresholds. By application of this novel analytical strategy, which we call the color activity concept, 13.5 % of the overall color of the reaction mixture was shown to be accounted for five colorants of known structures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)168-179
Number of pages12
JournalACS Symposium Series
Volume775
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

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