Temporal sound processing by cochlear nucleus octopus neurons

Werner Hemmert, Marcus Holmberg, Ulrich Ramacher

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

The human auditory system excels in the detection of signals in background noise. We evaluate the principles of robust processing with a detailed inner ear model and a model of octopus neurons in the cochlear nucleus. These neurons reject steady-state excitation and fire on signal onsets with extremely high temporal precision. Spike-triggered reversecorrelation analysis revealed that octopus neurons fire preferentially if many coincident spikes follow a short interval of relative low excitation. The frequency spectrum of the reverse-correlation revealed that octopus neurons perform a band-pass analysis of the incoming signal, with the pass-band ranging from about 110 to 650 Hz. The low-frequency slope was approximately 6 dB/oct, which indicates that octopus neurons process the first derivative of the input signal. This mechanism not only removes steady-state activity, which accentuates onsets, but also enhances amplitude modulation in the frequency region predominant in speech.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Pages583-588
Number of pages6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes
Event15th International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks: Biological Inspirations - ICANN 2005 - Warsaw, Poland
Duration: 11 Sep 200515 Sep 2005

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume3696 LNCS
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Conference

Conference15th International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks: Biological Inspirations - ICANN 2005
Country/TerritoryPoland
CityWarsaw
Period11/09/0515/09/05

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