Soil phosphorus bioavailability assessed by XANES and Hedley sequential fractionation technique in a glacier foreland chronosequence in Gongga Mountain, Southwestern China

Yan Hong Wu, Jörg Prietzel, Jun Zhou, Hai Jian Bing, Ji Luo, Dong Yu, Shou Qin Sun, Jian Hong Liang, Hong Yang Sun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

The primary productivity of terrestrial ecosystems is influenced by soil phosphorus bioavailability, which depends largely on chemical fractions of phosphorus. The sequential fractionation technique developed by Hedley et al. or its subsequent modification is a well-known method to determine soil phosphorus forms. Hedley sequential fractionation technique separates the phosphorus into fractions based on their different chemical solubilities in extractants with certain chemical properties. Recently, synchrotron-based X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy has been employed to measure soil phosphorus species directly and non-invasively. The XANES method provides information concerning local structure and chemical information of target elements at a molecular level. Thus, it can distinguish phosphorus fractions bound by metal oxides or hydroxides (such as Fe, Al, and Ca). In this present work, the phosphorus speciation of topsoil along a glacial foreland chronosequence in Gongga Mountain is determined using these two methods. The changes in soil phosphorus bioavailability along the 120-year-old chronosequence are assessed based on comparisons of the results obtained by these two methods. The results indicate that Hedley sequential fractionation technique shows a greater ability to determine soil bioavailable phosphorus (Resin-P and NaCHO3-P), while XANES is effective in distinguishing phosphorus bound by metal compounds. In the chronosequence, Ca- and Al-bound phosphorus were derived mainly from primary minerals, whose phosphorus contents decreased within 120 years of moraine weathering and soil development. The content of soil bioavailable phosphorus increased rapidly after 30 years since deglaciation. The increasing phosphorus bioavailability promoted the colonizing and primary succession vegetation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1860-1868
Number of pages9
JournalScience China Earth Sciences
Volume57
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2014

Keywords

  • Hailuogou
  • Hedley sequential fractionation technique
  • XANES
  • phosphorus forms
  • soil

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