Simulation of particle levitation due to dielectrophoresis

Véronique Rochus, Stephan Hanner, Jean Claude Golinval, Daniel Rixen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The aim of the research is to model accurately dielectrophoresis using different numerical tools and compare them to experimental results. The dielectrophoresis phenomenon consists in the creation of electrostatic forces on nano or micro particles due to a gradient of electric field. The aim of such a setup is to control the motion of micro or nano particles for MEMS applications, for instance, for bioanalysis devices[2, 5, 8, 6, 9]. To validate the numerical results, some prototypes have been fabricated at TU Delft. Using these simulations, a design of microstructure has been chosen to levitate Silica micro-particles. Experimental measurements have been performed and some characteristic behaviours of particle depending on the amplitude and the frequency of the applied voltage have been identified. The measurements are compared to the numerical simulation.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2010 11th International Conference on Thermal, Mechanical and Multi-Physics Simulation, and Experiments in Microelectronics and Microsystems, EuroSimE 2010
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes
Event2010 11th International Conference on Thermal, Mechanical and Multi-Physics Simulation, and Experiments in Microelectronics and Microsystems, EuroSimE 2010 - Bordeaux, France
Duration: 26 Apr 201028 Apr 2010

Publication series

Name2010 11th International Conference on Thermal, Mechanical and Multi-Physics Simulation, and Experiments in Microelectronics and Microsystems, EuroSimE 2010

Conference

Conference2010 11th International Conference on Thermal, Mechanical and Multi-Physics Simulation, and Experiments in Microelectronics and Microsystems, EuroSimE 2010
Country/TerritoryFrance
CityBordeaux
Period26/04/1028/04/10

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