Short- and long-term effects of students' self-directed metacognitive prompts on navigation behavior and learning performance

Maria Bannert, Christoph Sonnenberg, Christoph Mengelkamp, Elisabeth Pieger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

121 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study seeks to promote learning in computer-based learning environments utilizing students' self-directed metacognitive prompts. Such prompts are based on the idea of instructing students to design their own metacognitive scaffolds and learn with them afterward. In a pre-post experimental design, students in the experimental group (n = 35) were instructed to configure their own metacognitive prompts before learning whereas students in the control group (n = 35) learned without prompts. Log file analysis of navigation behavior indicates that students who learned with their individually designed, self-directed prompts visited relevant webpages significantly more often and spent a longer time on them compared with students in the control group. Moreover, participants in the experimental group attained better transfer performance immediately after learning. The long-term effect in transfer performance was even greater in a follow-up learning session conducted after three weeks without any instructional support in either group. These results are consistent with theories of metacognition and self-regulated learning and indicate that self-directed prompts can lead to sustainable effects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)293-306
Number of pages14
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume52
DOIs
StatePublished - 22 Jun 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Knowledge acquisition
  • Long-term effects
  • Metacognition
  • Metacognitive prompts
  • Metacognitive skills
  • Self-directed prompts

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