Scalable Processing Routes for the Production of All-Solid-State Batteries—Modeling Interdependencies of Product and Process

Célestine Singer, Joscha Schnell, Gunther Reinhart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

The all-solid-state battery (ASSB) based on a solid ionic conductor is a significant future concept for energy storage. In respect of the growing global demand for batteries, a systematic study on processing thin-layer and large-area ASSBs is addressed herein. As ASSB cells are mainly produced on a laboratory scale, an introduction to industrial production is needed. Therefore, the formation, ranking, and selection of technology chains are presented concerning the strategic orientation of cell manufacturing companies. A system model consisting of five sub-models is created, which connects technologies with production-relevant parameters. The results are used for a tool that automatically generates and evaluates technology chains in dependence of the ASSB cell design. Starting from the layer fabrication technologies further up- and downstream processes are defined. For sulfidic solid electrolytes, e.g., a ball milling followed by the aerosol deposition method, hot pressing, and laser cutting are favorable in terms of high-quality layers and low production volume, whereas planetary mixing, tape casting, calendering, and die cutting are the choice for a high-throughput production. Based on these findings, processing routes for every cell design and solid electrolyte material can be generated concerning company-specific criteria, thus enabling the industrial application.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2000665
JournalEnergy Technology
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2021

Keywords

  • all-solid-state batteries
  • all-solid-state battery production
  • production planning
  • sulfide solid electrolytes
  • system modeling

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