Reduced-intensity conditioning using TBI (8 Gy), fludarabine, cyclophosphamide and ATG in elderly CML patients provides excellent results especially when performed in the early course of the disease

Martin Weisser, M. Schleuning, G. Ledderose, B. Rolf, S. Schnittger, C. Schoch, R. Schwerdtfeger, H. J. Kolb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

Allogeneic bone marrow or stem cell transplantation is a curative therapeutic option for chronic myelogenous leukemia. In order to decrease the toxicity of the procedure, the dosage of total body irradiation was reduced from 12 to 8 Gy and subsequently the dose of cyclophosphamide from 120 to 80 mg/kg. The purine analogue fludarabine, ATG, cyclosporine A and a short course of methotrexate were given for immune suppression. So far, 35 elderly CML patients with sibling and unrelated donors have been transplanted. Transplant-related mortality at day + 100 was 11%. After engraftment, all patients achieved a complete cytogenetic remission. Relapse occurred in 14% of the patients. The risk of relapse was significantly higher in those patients transplanted in second chronic or accelerated phase (P = 0.048). After a median follow-up of 30 months (range 12-62), 63% of the patients are alive. Those patients transplanted within the first year from diagnosis had an overall survival of 79% (P = 0.049), emphasizing the benefit of early transplantation. Stepwise reduction of conditioning intensity resulted in stable engraftment, low relapse rates and encouraging overall survival in this high-risk patient group.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1083-1088
Number of pages6
JournalBone Marrow Transplantation
Volume34
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2004
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Allogeneic transplantation
  • Chronic myelogenous leukemia
  • Reduced-intensity conditioning

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