Range and Doppler Correction for Velocity Vector Estimation using Distributed Non-Coherent Radar Sensors

Christian Buchberger, Alexander Schoisl, Erwin Biebl

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Distributed multistatic configurations are increasingly being investigated to improve the capabilities of radar systems in automotive applications. In comparison to monostatic systems, they benefit from multiple view angles that help characterize targets by evaluating estimated monostatic and bistatic radar cross-sections. Also, they enable an increase in spatial resolution as well as the determination of target velocity vectors in one measurement. Depending on the level of coherency of the distributed radar system, different synchronization steps have to be performed before the velocity vectors can be determined. This paper presents range and Doppler correction for non-coherent single-sided bistatic radars using a self-calibration technique. The accuracy of the velocity vector estimation is then evaluated by measurements using a fully automated experimental setup that enables arbitrary target locations, velocities, and movement directions. The results show that high accuracies can be achieved after using the presented correction steps.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2022 Kleinheubach Conference, KHB 2022
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
ISBN (Electronic)9783948571078
StatePublished - 2022
Event2022 Kleinheubach Conference, KHB 2022 - Miltenberg, Germany
Duration: 27 Sep 202229 Sep 2022

Publication series

Name2022 Kleinheubach Conference, KHB 2022

Conference

Conference2022 Kleinheubach Conference, KHB 2022
Country/TerritoryGermany
CityMiltenberg
Period27/09/2229/09/22

Keywords

  • Millimeter wave radar
  • automotive applications
  • bistatic radar
  • radar signal processing

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