Photoacoustic and absorption spectroscopy imaging analysis of human blood

Wei Yun Tsai, Stephan Breimann, Tsu Wang Shen, Dmitrij Frishman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Photoacoustic and absorption spectroscopy imaging are safe and non-invasive molecular quantification techniques, which do not utilize ionizing radiation and allow for repeated probing of samples without them being contaminated or damaged. Here we assessed the potential of these techniques for measuring biochemical parameters. We investigated the statistical association between 31 time and frequency domain features derived from photoacoustic and absorption spectroscopy signals and 19 biochemical blood parameters. We found that photoacoustic and absorption spectroscopy imaging features are significantly correlated with 14 and 17 individual biochemical parameters, respectively. Moreover, some of the biochemical blood parameters can be accurately predicted based on photoacoustic and absorption spectroscopy imaging features by polynomial regression. In particular, the levels of uric acid and albumin can be accurately explained by a combination of photoacoustic and absorption spectroscopy imaging features (adjusted R-squared > 0.75), while creatinine levels can be accurately explained by the features of the photoacoustic system (adjusted R-squared > 0.80). We identified a number of imaging features that inform on the biochemical blood parameters and can be potentially useful in clinical diagnosis. We also demonstrated that linear and non-linear combinations of photoacoustic and absorption spectroscopy imaging features can accurately predict some of the biochemical blood parameters. These results demonstrate that photoacoustic and absorption spectroscopy imaging systems show promise for future applications in clinical practice.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0289704
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume18
Issue number8 August
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2023

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