No effect of the 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3on β-cell residual function and insulin requirement in adults with new-onset type 1 diabetes

Markus Walter, Thomas Kaupper, Kerstin Adler, Johannes Foersch, Ezio Bonifacio, Anette G. Ziegler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

120 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - To determine whether daily intake of 1α,25- dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] is safe and improves β-cell function in patients with recently diagnosed type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Safety was assessed in an open study of 25 patients aged 18-39 years with recent-onset type 1 diabetes who received 0.25 μg 1,25(OH)2D3 daily for 9 months. An additional 40 patients were randomly assigned to 0.25 μg 1,25(OH)2D3 or placebo daily for 9 months and followed for a total of 18 months for safety, β-cell function, insulin requirement, and glycemic control. RESULTS - Safety assessment showed values in the normal range in nearly all patients, regardless of whether they received 1,25(OH)2D3 or placebo. No differences in AUC C-peptide, peak C-peptide, and fasting C-peptide after a mixed-meal tolerance test between the treatment and placebo groups were observed at 9 and 18 months after study entry, with ∼40% loss for each parameter over the 18-month period. A1C and daily insulin requirement were similar between treatment and placebo groups throughout the study follow-up period. CONCLUSIONS - Treatment with 1,25(OH)2D3 at a daily dose of 0.25 μg was safe but did not reduce loss of β-cell function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1443-1448
Number of pages6
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume33
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2010
Externally publishedYes

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