Multi-attribute modelling of economic and ecological impacts of agricultural innovations on cropping systems

Sara Scatasta, Justus Wesseler, Matty Demont, Marko Bohanec, Sašo Džeroski, Martin Žnidaršič

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this paper we present an extension to some preliminary results of developing an integral model of economic and ecological impacts of genetically modified crops. The model entails four sub-models. The first two sub-models are concerned with ecology and assess the ecological impacts of various types of pest and weed control strategies. The other two sub-models assess economic impacts of cropping systems at farm and regional level, respectively. We show how social and private costs and benefits, both at farm and regional level, can be classified in reversible and irreversible. The implications of irreversibility on the size of the uncertainty associated to the adoption of agricultural innovations is also modelled and discussed. All the models are developed using a qualitative multi-attribute modelling methodology, supported by the software tool DEXi.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationWMSCI 2005 - The 9th World Multi-Conference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics, Proceedings
Pages447-452
Number of pages6
StatePublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes
Event9th World Multi-Conference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics, WMSCI 2005 - Orlando, FL, United States
Duration: 10 Jul 200513 Jul 2005

Publication series

NameWMSCI 2005 - The 9th World Multi-Conference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics, Proceedings
Volume10

Conference

Conference9th World Multi-Conference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics, WMSCI 2005
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityOrlando, FL
Period10/07/0513/07/05

Keywords

  • Bt Corn
  • Field trials
  • France
  • Irreversible social costs
  • Real option approach

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