Molecular interactions between bacteria, the epithelium, and the mucosal immune system in the intestinal tract: Implications for chronic inflammation

Thomas Clavell, Dirk Haller

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

46 Scopus citations

Abstract

In the last few years, advances in immunology, metabolomics and microbial ecology have shown that the contribution of the intestinal microbiota to the overall health status of the host has been so far underestimated. In this context, intestinal epithelial cells play a crucial role in the maintenance of intestinal homoeostasis. Indeed, at the interface between the luminal content and host tissues, the intestinal epithelium must integrate pro- and anti-inflammatory signals to regulate innate and adaptative immune responses, i.e. to control inflammation. However, under the influence of environmental factors, disturbance of the dialog between enteric bacteria and epithelial cells contributes to the development of chronic inflammation in genetically susceptible hosts. The present review covers the state of knowledge of the host response, especially in intestinal epithelial cells, to enteric bacteria, including colitogenic and probiotic bacteria. It also seeks to give an overview of potential regulatory mechanisms involved in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis, and discusses the clinical implications for inflammatory bowel diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)25-43
Number of pages19
JournalCurrent Issues in Intestinal Microbiology
Volume8
Issue number2
StatePublished - Sep 2007
Externally publishedYes

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