Making chord go mobile

Stefan Zöls, Rüdigger Schollmeier, Wolfgang Kellerer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

The Chord protocol is a structured Peer-to-Peer (P2P) protocol based on distributed hash tables (DHT). By using hash keys to identify the nodes in the network and also the shared objects, it can significantly reduce the signaling overhead in a P2P overlay network, as flooding of query messages can be avoided. However, when nodes join or leave the Chord network, object references have to be rearranged in order to maintain the hash key mapping rules. This leads to high maintenance traffic, especially when nodes stay in the Chord ring only for a short time. In mobile environments, the resources and data rates of mobile devices are limited, so the maintenance traffic generated by shifting object references may cause problems when using Chord in a mobile scenario. In this work, we present a solution to the problem of frequent joins and leaves of nodes. By distinguishing static nodes and temporary nodes, we can decrease the maintenance traffic generated by shifting object references significantly.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationKommunikation in Verteilten Systemen, KiVS 2005 - Kurzbeitrage und Workshop der 14. GI/ITG-Fachtagung
Pages215-218
Number of pages4
StatePublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes
Event14. GI/ITG Fachtagung Kommunikation in Verteilten Systemen, KiVS 2005 - 14th GI/ITG Conference on Communication in Distributed Systems, KiVS 2005 - Kaiserslautern, Germany
Duration: 28 Feb 20053 Mar 2005

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Informatics (LNI), Proceedings - Series of the Gesellschaft fur Informatik (GI)
VolumeP-61
ISSN (Print)1617-5468

Conference

Conference14. GI/ITG Fachtagung Kommunikation in Verteilten Systemen, KiVS 2005 - 14th GI/ITG Conference on Communication in Distributed Systems, KiVS 2005
Country/TerritoryGermany
CityKaiserslautern
Period28/02/053/03/05

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Making chord go mobile'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this