Long-term effects of hydrolyzed protein infant formulas on growth-extended follow-up to 10 y of age: Results from the German Infant Nutritional Intervention (GINI) study

Peter Rzehak, Stefanie Sausenthaler, Sibylle Koletzko, Dietrich Reinhardt, Andrea Von Berg, Ursula Kramed̈r, Dietrich Berdel, Christina Bollrath, Armin Grub̈l, Carl P. Bauer, H. Erich Wichmann, Joachim Heinrich

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Abstract

Background: Previous analysis in a prospective, population-based cohort reported reduced weight gain in children fed extensively hydrolyzed casein (eHF-C) formula during the first year of life but showed no effect on growth between 1 and 6 y of life. No studies have been conducted in children up to the age of 10 y. Objective: The objective was to investigate potential differences in body mass index (BMI) over the first 10 y of life between infants fed within the intervention period of the first 16 wk of life with partially hydrolyzed whey (pHF-W), extensively hydrolyzed whey (eHF-W), eHF-C, or cow-milk formula (CMF) and infants exclusively breastfed (BF) within the intervention period. Design: This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind trial in full-term neonates with atopic heredity in the German birth cohort German Infant Nutritional Intervention (GINI) followed through the first 10 y of life. Analyses of absolute and World Health Organization (WHO)-standardized BMI trajectories for 1840 infants [pHF-W (n = 253), eHF-W (n = 265), eHF-C (n = 250), CMF (n = 276), and BF (n = 796)] were conducted according to intention-to-treat principles. Results: Except for the previously reported slower BMI gain in infants fed with eHF-C formula within the first year of life, no significant differences in absolute or WHO-standardized BMI trajectories were shown between the pHF-W, eHF-W, eHF-C, CMF, and BF groups thereafter up to the age of 10 y. Conclusions: Extension of the follow-up period from 6 to 10 y for this randomized controlled trial showed no long-term consequences on BMI for the 4 infant formulas considered. These data need to be confirmed in future studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1803S-1807S
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume94
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2011

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