Itch intensity evaluated in the German Atopic Dermatitis Intervention Study (GADIS): Correlations with quality of life, coping behaviour and SCORAD severity in 823 children

Elke Weisshaar, Thomas L. Diepgen, Thomas Bruckner, Manigé Fartasch, Jörg Kupfer, Thomas Lobcorzilius, Johannes Ring, Sibylle Scheewe, Reginald Scheidt, Gerhardt Schmid-Ott, Christina Schnopp, Doris Staab, Rüdiger Szczepanski, Thomas Werfel, Marita Wittenmeier, Ulrich Wahn, Uwe Gieler

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Abstract

The German Atopic Dermatitis Intervention Study (GADIS), which includes 823 children and adolescents, showed that age-related educational programmes are effective in the long-term management of atopic dermatitis. We investigated whether the itch severity obtained in the scoring of atopic dermatitis (SCORAD) correlates with quality of life and coping behaviour in children and parents. There were significant but low correlations between the severity of atopic dermatitis and the itch intensity. Itch and sleeplessness were significantly correlated. Significant correlations of itch with the coping behaviour and quality of life in parents of children with atopic dermatitis were measured. The coping and itching behaviour of children (8-12 years) and adolescents (13-18 years) had higher significant correlations with the itch compared with the parents' answers. Quality of life in children (8-12 years) and adolescents (13-18 years) showed a significant negative correlation with itch intensity. Quality of life, itch intensity and coping strategies should be considered when treating patients with atopic dermatitis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)234-239
Number of pages6
JournalActa Dermato-Venereologica
Volume88
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

Keywords

  • Atopic dermatitis
  • Coping behaviour
  • Itch
  • Quality of life

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