How do kindergarten and primary school children justify their decisions on planning science experiments?

Heidi Haslbeck, Eva Maria Lankes, Eva S. Fritzsche, Lucia Kohlhauf, Birgit J. Neuhaus

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

The ability to test questions and assumptions autonomously by systematic manipulation of variables in an experiment is a central aspect during designing and conducting scientific investigations. It is unknown if children already use the control of variable strategy (CVS) as their argumentation strategy for designing experiments. We compare which argumentation strategy children use to justify their decisions on planning science experiments. Primary school children more often chose non-confounded experiments compared to kindergarten children.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication13th International Conference of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2018
Subtitle of host publicationRethinking Learning in the Digital Age: Making the Learning Sciences Count
EditorsRosemary Luckin, Judy Kay
PublisherInternational Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS)
Pages1601-1602
Number of pages2
Volume3
Edition2018-June
ISBN (Electronic)9780990355052
ISBN (Print)9781732467224
StatePublished - 2018
Event13th International Conference of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2018: Rethinking Learning in the Digital Age: Making the Learning Sciences Count - London, United Kingdom
Duration: 23 Jun 201827 Jun 2018

Conference

Conference13th International Conference of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2018: Rethinking Learning in the Digital Age: Making the Learning Sciences Count
Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period23/06/1827/06/18

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