Formic acid as a suitable material for H2 and CO2 catalytic storage and release

Dörthe Mellmann, Peter Sponholz, Henrik Junge, Matthias Beller

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Herein, we present the catalytic hydrogen (H2) release from the renewable fuel formic acid (FA, HCO2H) under ambient conditions. Also, reversible hydrogen storage as FA or formates is provided by highly stable catalysts even at room temperature. The way to continuous FA dehydrogenation is exemplified by the set-up of a pressure stable reaction system. This was used for stability and performance tests as well as subsequent catalyst optimization to yield a suitable hydrogen gas mixture for its direct use in fuel cells (FC). The ruthenium catalyst was stable for 45 days performing H2 generation with a turnover number (TON) of one million at room temperature. Hydrogen flows of 47 L/h could be achieved in the 100 W electrical power range. Finally, looking for cheap and abundant metals, an iron-based catalyst system has been developed with high activity and stability comparable to those of noble-metal based catalysts.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEFC 2013 - Proceedings of the 5th European Fuel Cell Piero Lunghi Conference
EditorsViviana Cigolotti, Chiara Barchiesi, Michela Chianella
PublisherENEA
Pages371-372
Number of pages2
ISBN (Electronic)9788882862978
StatePublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes
Event5th European Fuel Cell Piero Lunghi Conference and Exhibition, EFC 2013 - Rome, Italy
Duration: 11 Dec 201313 Dec 2013

Publication series

NameEFC 2013 - Proceedings of the 5th European Fuel Cell Piero Lunghi Conference

Conference

Conference5th European Fuel Cell Piero Lunghi Conference and Exhibition, EFC 2013
Country/TerritoryItaly
CityRome
Period11/12/1313/12/13

Keywords

  • Catalytic dehydrogenation
  • Formic acid
  • Hydrogen storage
  • Ruthenium

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