Feedback controlled force enhancement and activation reduction of voluntarily activated quadriceps femoris during sub-maximal muscle action

Wolfgang Seiberl, Daniel Hahn, Walter Herzog, Ansgar Schwirtz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

40 Scopus citations

Abstract

Stretch of activated muscles leads to enhanced forces compared to isometric contractions at the same muscle length and the same level of activation. This so-called residual force enhancement (RFE) is thought to be a property of all muscles and preparations. However, observations concerning the existence, amount and duration of RFE are inconsistent, especially for voluntary activated large human muscles. Therefore, physiological relevance for daily activity is still questionable and the purpose of this study was to examine whether RFE is present in voluntary sub-maximal activated quadriceps femoris (QF). Seated in a rotational dynamometer with EMG attached to superficial parts of QF, 30 subjects performed isometric and isometric-eccentric-isometric contractions (20° stretch, ω=60°s -1) at 30% and 60% of maximum voluntary activation (MVA) and contraction (MVC). To account for the complexity of the multi-headed QF, a compensation model based on physiological cross-sectional area and individual EMG-torque relations was used to interpret EMG data. For both levels of intensity and both feedback control strategies, ANOVA identified significant RFE (at the same level of activation) and reduced activation (at the same level of torque). Against expectations, RFE was independent of the level of activation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)117-123
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Electromyography and Kinesiology
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2012

Keywords

  • EMG-torque relation
  • Electromyography
  • History dependence
  • In vivo
  • Passive force enhancement
  • Physiological cross-sectional area

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Feedback controlled force enhancement and activation reduction of voluntarily activated quadriceps femoris during sub-maximal muscle action'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this