Estimation of multijoint limb stiffness from EMG during reaching movements

David W. Franklin, Frances Leung, Mitsuo Kawato, Theodore E. Milner

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Endpoint stiffness of the human arm was indirectly estimated using electromyographic activity (EMC) during reaching movements. Subjects performed point to point reaching movements in various dynamic environments while coupled to a robotic manipulator. Surface EMC from six muscles was recorded and direct measurements of endpoint stiffness were made. EMG was filtered using a pulse transfer function and a relationship between joint torque and EMG was obtained. From this a simple method was used to transform the muscle activity into joint stiffness and finally endpoint stiffness. The results were scaled based on a few selected values of measured endpoint stiffness. This technique successfully captured the main characteristics of the measured endpoint stiffness. This technique could be used to estimate endpoint stiffness during conditions when measuring stiffness would be too time consuming or difficult.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAPBME 2003 - IEEE EMBS Asian-Pacific Conference on Biomedical Engineering 2003
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages224-225
Number of pages2
ISBN (Electronic)0780379438, 9780780379435
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003
Externally publishedYes
EventIEEE EMBS Asian-Pacific Conference on Biomedical Engineering 2003, APBME 2003 - Kyoto-Osaka-Nara, Japan
Duration: 20 Oct 200322 Oct 2003

Publication series

NameAPBME 2003 - IEEE EMBS Asian-Pacific Conference on Biomedical Engineering 2003

Conference

ConferenceIEEE EMBS Asian-Pacific Conference on Biomedical Engineering 2003, APBME 2003
Country/TerritoryJapan
CityKyoto-Osaka-Nara
Period20/10/0322/10/03

Keywords

  • Endpoint stiffness
  • Force field adaptation
  • Impedance
  • Joint stiffness
  • Joint torque

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