Diet prevents the expansion of segmented filamentous bacteria and ileo-colonic inflammation in a model of Crohn’s disease

Amira Metwaly, Jelena Jovic, Nadine Waldschmitt, Sevana Khaloian, Helena Heimes, Deborah Häcker, Mohamed Ahmed, Nassim Hammoudi, Lionel Le Bourhis, Aida Mayorgas, Kolja Siebert, Marijana Basic, Tobias Schwerd, Matthieu Allez, Julian Panes, Azucena Salas, André Bleich, Sebastian Zeissig, Pamela Schnupf, Fabio CominelliDirk Haller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Crohn’s disease (CD) is associated with changes in the microbiota, and murine models of CD-like ileo-colonic inflammation depend on the presence of microbial triggers. Increased abundance of unknown Clostridiales and the microscopic detection of filamentous structures close to the epithelium of TnfΔARE mice, a mouse model of CD-like ileitis pointed towards segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB), a commensal mucosal adherent bacterium involved in ileal inflammation. Results: We show that the abundance of SFB strongly correlates with the severity of CD-like ileal inflammation in two mouse models of ileal inflammation, including TnfΔARE and SAMP/Yit mice. SFB mono-colonization of germ-free TnfΔARE mice confirmed the causal link and resulted in severe ileo-colonic inflammation, characterized by elevated tissue levels of Tnf and Il-17A, neutrophil infiltration and loss of Paneth and goblet cell function. Co-colonization of SFB in human-microbiota associated TnfΔARE mice confirmed that SFB presence is indispensable for disease development. Screening of 468 ileal and colonic mucosal biopsies from adult and pediatric IBD patients, using previously published and newly designed human SFB-specific primer sets, showed no presence of SFB in human tissue samples, suggesting a species-specific functionality of the pathobiont. Simulating the human relevant therapeutic effect of exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN), EEN-like purified diet antagonized SFB colonization and prevented disease development in TnfΔARE mice, providing functional evidence for the protective mechanism of diet in modulating microbiota-dependent inflammation in IBD. Conclusions: We identified a novel pathogenic role of SFB in driving severe CD-like ileo-colonic inflammation characterized by loss of Paneth and goblet cell functions in TnfΔARE mice. A purified diet antagonized SFB colonization and prevented disease development in TnfΔARE mice in contrast to a fiber-containing chow diet, clearly demonstrating the important role of diet in modulating a novel IBD-relevant pathobiont and supporting a direct link between diet and microbial communities in mediating protective functions. [MediaObject not available: see fulltext.]

Original languageEnglish
Article number66
JournalMicrobiome
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2023

Keywords

  • Crohn’s disease
  • IBD
  • Inflammation
  • Pathobiont
  • Purified diet
  • Segmented filamentous bacteria
  • Tnf mice

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