Current issues and future research priorities for health economic modelling across the full continuum of Alzheimer's disease

Anders Gustavsson, Colin Green, Roy W. Jones, Hans Förstl, Deniz Simsek, Frederic de Reydet de Vulpillieres, Stefanie Luthman, Nicholas Adlard, Subrata Bhattacharyya, Anders Wimo

Research output: Contribution to journalShort surveypeer-review

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

Available data and models for the health-economic evaluation of treatment in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have limitations causing uncertainty to decision makers. Forthcoming treatment strategies in preclinical or early AD warrant an update on the challenges associated with their economic evaluation. The perspectives of the co-authors were complemented with a targeted review of literature discussing methodological issues and data gaps in AD health-economic modelling. The methods and data available to translate treatment efficacy in early disease into long-term outcomes of relevance to policy makers and payers are limited. Current long-term large-scale data accurately representing the continuous, multifaceted, and heterogeneous disease process are missing. The potential effect of disease-modifying treatment on key long-term outcomes such as institutionalization and death is uncertain but may have great effect on cost-effectiveness. Future research should give priority to collaborative efforts to access better data on the natural progression of AD and its association with key long-term outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)312-321
Number of pages10
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Cost-effectiveness
  • Dementia
  • Disease modification
  • Disease progression
  • Economic evaluation
  • Health care decision making
  • Modelling
  • Outcomes
  • Preclinical

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