Comparison of hydrogenated vegetable shortening and nutritionally complete high-fat diet on limited access-binge behavior in rats

Jon F. Davis, Susan J. Melhorn, Jennifer D. Shurdak, Justin U. Heiman, Matthias H. Tschöp, Deborah J. Clegg, Stephen C. Benoit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previous studies have suggested that intermittent exposure to hydrogenated vegetable shortening yields a binge/compensate pattern of feeding in rats. The present study was designed to assess whether rats would exhibit similar patterns of intake when given intermittent access to a nutritionally complete high-fat diet. Four groups of rats received varying exposure to either hydrogenated vegetable shortening or high-fat diet for 8 consecutive weeks. Animals were given daily and intermittent access to determine if the binge/compensate pattern of feeding was frequency dependent. At the conclusion of the study, body composition and plasma leptin levels were assessed to determine effects of diet and binge/compensate intake on endocrine alterations. As predicted, animals receiving intermittent access to high-fat diet displayed the binge/compensate pattern of feeding and appeared to compensate as a result of the caloric overload accompanying a particular binge episode. In addition, exposure to either shortening or high-fat diet led to alterations in body composition, while only exposure to shortening altered plasma leptin levels. These results suggest that binge-intake behavior occurs on a nutritionally complete high-fat diet and that this regimen is capable of altering both body composition and endocrine profile.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)924-930
Number of pages7
JournalPhysiology and Behavior
Volume92
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 5 Dec 2007

Keywords

  • Binge-intake behavior
  • Binge/compensate
  • Eating disorders
  • High-fat diet
  • Meal feeding

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