Assessment of cognitive workload of in-vehicle systems using a visual peripheral and tactile detection task setting

Klaus Bengler, Martin Kohlmann, Christian Lange

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

The increase of driver information and infotainment systems includes also interaction technologies like speech interaction that minimize visual-manual demand and put the focus to cognitive demand. The question is whether this could lead to distraction effects and decreased traffic safety. This study presents an evaluation methodfor cognitive demand based on different detection paradigms in a dual task setting. A listening and a backward counting task are realized on three difficulty levels as simulations of cognitively loading secondary tasks and investigated using a visual versus a tactile detection paradigm. The results show that both detection paradigms are able to discriminate the task levels and that subjects successfully apply compensation strategies in the dual task setting especially during the listening task.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4919-4923
Number of pages5
JournalWork
Volume41
Issue numberSUPPL.1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

Keywords

  • Cognitive workload
  • Detection Response Task
  • Driver Distraction
  • Mental workload
  • Peripheral Detection
  • Tactile Detection

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