Antimicrobial resistance of bacteraemia in the emergency department of a German university hospital (2013-2018): Potential carbapenem-sparing empiric treatment options in light of the new EUCAST recommendations

Kathrin Rothe, Nina Wantia, Christoph D. Spinner, Jochen Schneider, Tobias Lahmer, Birgit Waschulzik, Roland M. Schmid, Dirk H. Busch, Juri Katchanov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: This study investigated predominant microorganisms causing community-onset bacteraemia at the medical emergency department (ED) of a tertiary-care university hospital in Germany from 2013 to 2018 and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Methods: Antimicrobial resistance patterns in patients with positive blood cultures presenting to an internal medicine ED were retrospectively analysed. Results: Blood cultures were obtained at 5191 of 66,879 ED encounters, with 1013 (19.5%) positive results, and true positive results at 740 encounters (diagnostic yield, 14.3%). The most frequently isolated relevant microorganisms were Enterobacterales (n = 439, 59.3%), Staphylococcus aureus (n = 92, 12.4%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 34, 4.6%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 32, 4.3%), Streptococcus pyogenes (n = 16, 2.2%), Enterococcus faecalis (n = 18, 2.4%), and Enterococcus faecium (n = 12, 1.6%). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed a high proportion of resistance against ampicillin-sulbactam in Enterobacterales (42.2%). The rate of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was low (0.4%). Piperacillin-tazobactam therapy provided coverage for 83.2% of all relevant pathogens using conventional breakpoints. Application of the new European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) recommendations increased the percentage of susceptible isolates to high-dose piperacillin-tazobactam to 92.8% (p < 0.001). Broad-spectrum carbapenems would only cover an additional 4.8%. The addition of vancomycin or linezolid extended coverage by just 1.7%. Conclusions: Using an ureidopenicillin-beta-lactamase inhibitor combination at the high dose suggested by the new EUCAST recommendations provided nearly 93% coverage for relevant pathogens in patients with suspected bloodstream infection in our cohort. This might offer a safe option to reduce the empiric use of carbapenems. Our data support the absence of a general need for glycopeptides or oxazolidinones in empiric treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1091
JournalBMC Infectious Diseases
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 30 Dec 2019

Keywords

  • Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern
  • Blood cultures
  • Community-onset bacteraemia
  • EUCAST
  • Emergency department
  • Treatment regimen

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