A new analysis method using Bragg curve spectroscopy for a Multi-purpose Active-target Particle Telescope for radiation monitoring

M. J. Losekamm, M. Milde, T. Pöschl, D. Greenwald, S. Paul

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Traditional radiation detectors can either measure the total radiation dose omnidirectionally (dosimeters), or determine the incoming particles characteristics within a narrow field of view (spectrometers). Instantaneous measurements of anisotropic fluxes thus require several detectors, resulting in bulky setups. The Multi-purpose Active-target Particle Telescope (MAPT), employing a new detection principle, is designed to measure particle fluxes omnidirectionally and be simultaneously a dosimeter and spectrometer. It consists of an active core of scintillating fibers whose light output is measured by silicon photomultipliers, and fits into a cube with an edge length of 10 cm. It identifies particles using extended Bragg curve spectroscopy, with sensitivity to charged particles with kinetic energies above 25 MeV. MAPT's unique layout results in a geometrical acceptance of approximately 800 cm2 sr and an angular resolution of less than 6°, which can be improved by track-fitting procedures. In a beam test of a simplified prototype, the energy resolution was found to be less than 1 MeV for protons with energies between 30 and 70 MeV. Possible applications of MAPT include the monitoring of radiation environments in spacecraft and beam monitoring in medical facilities.

Keywords

  • Active target
  • Bragg curve spectroscopy
  • Medical physics
  • Radiation detector
  • Radiation monitoring
  • Space exploration

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